US 1.877.212326.2662
A common challenge when implementing SharePoint is clearly defining why the technology is being rolled out in the first place. In order to achieve success, a clear definition and understanding of the business value SharePoint brings to your organization is necessary. This white paper walks through the process of assessing and prioritizing business needs and properly developing requirements for SharePoint projects.
About the Author:
Dux Raymond Sy is a managing partner of Innovative-e, a SharePoint MVP, and author of SharePoint for Project Management.
Excerpt

Taking a generalized, fast food order-taking approach to a SharePoint implementation is not effective in meeting business needs, yet countless IT departments frequently make this fundamental mistake. That’s why in a lot of organizations, business users often end up viewing SharePoint as nothing more than a glorified network share.

The key to meeting business needs is to first engage with the business users, understand their pain points, and identify how SharePoint can provide the solution to address these business-specific needs. You do not want to throw a set of solutions at business users and then tell them to go look for a problem to solve.

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A Classic Study on Risk/Reward for SharePoint Solutions
Take an in-depth look at the costs and risks associated with the custom development of SharePoint solutions versus the assembly of applications with available add-ons and third-party components. Various scenarios and decision-making criteria will help you in choosing an approach for delivering SharePoint-based applications.
About the Author:
Mike Tanner is the President of Adexta, Inc. He is a trusted advisor in the enterprise technology space
Excerpt

The ability to easily configure Microsoft® SharePoint® out-of-the-box to support unique end user solutions is advantageous, but when the solution requirements demand custom software development as opposed to simple configuration, IT organizations often discover that the results are unpredictable. Which is the optimal approach: building custom software for SharePoint and owning the resulting intellectual property, or licensing commercial off-the-shelf software add-ons that extend SharePoint and then configuring them to support unique solutions?

This paper makes the case that underestimation of software development costs and the risks associated with custom development is a leading cause for unpredictable results. The case for using configurable commercial software rather than custom-developed software is examined as a way to shorten implementation time, reduce project risks, and significantly lower deployment costs.

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